Dog movies, with a doggie!

Hello !
If I had to describe what interests me in two words it would be quite simple:
Movies and dogs… and cats… and cooking… and video games… and…

Okay, it wouldn’t be as simple as that but brief. Today, I wanted to talk to you about animated films about doggies!

And yes to write this article, I am accompanied by my big baby Nyx!

Underdog by Oh Sung-yoon, Lee Choon-Baek:


Moong-chi is a good doggie, a nice and attractive border collie that his masters decide to abandon in the forest. He will therefore meet other dogs left to their own devices, surviving as best they can, founding a pack where canine solidarity is required.
Their goal ? Go as far as possible from its humans who abandoned them and find this little corner of paradise for the canine race.

So I prefer to warn immediately, this is a film for a rather young audience, with a moral cross between a Ghibli and a Disney, which reminds us that we have to trust each other.
It is a story that denounces the unfortunate abandonment of dogs that are massively made in South Korea but whose message has an international resonance.
Although the narration is quite naive, there are a few moments that will make you draw a little tear. (Yes I cried >.<)

The big advantage of the film is its aesthetics. Mix of fine and soft line paint with a delicate and felted 3d. There are beautiful caricature aspects on the characters, the film remains very beautiful and remains a real pleasure to see with the family.

Isle Of Dogs by Wes Anderson:


In dystopian Japan, a strange virus is spreading in the canine population. The mayor of Nagasaki then decides to send all the dogs in the city to a trash island, starting with Spot, the faithful companion of his nephew Atari. He will then try to find him, but following an airplane crash, he will be rescued by five abandoned dogs, who will help him find the spot. But his alpha-style doggies have a little bit of faith in this little man, so similar in nature to his humans who hunted them.

Isle Of Dogs is a film made entirely in stop motion, as Wes Anderson had already done with
“Fantastic Mr. Fox” in 2010. It took him two years to make the film for a total of 130,000 photographs, an average of 185 shots per day.
The film is obviously a great tribute to Japanese cinema and particularly to the director Akira Kurosawa. (“Yojimbo”, “Seven Samurai” …)
Again we are in a story of dogs abandoned by humans, who must learn to survive by supporting each other.

I’m not used to doing this, but I would like to take this opportunity to encourage you, if you have the means, of course, to make a small donation for one of the various animal protection organizations in your country.

Oliver & Company by George Scribner


This is the story of Oliver, a little red cat abandoned on the streets of New York. He meets Dodger a dog proud of his freedom and his band, rather eclectic, who will bring him into their pack.
Oliver is finally adopted by the nice Genie, but his pack fearing his misfortune, decides to recover him and lead him and his new mistress in terrible adventures.
Well it’s a Disney with good moral as there are so many, but what a swing, what looks… We are making a big fuss about Disney music, and my memories are probably blurred (it’s been a little over 8 years since I did not see it with the sound), but as a child, I found them great.

This is obviously a story inspired by the novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens, this young orphan who finds himself playing pickpockets in the streets of London.
Oliver & Company is also a tribute film, we see lots of characters from previous Disney like Pongo the Dalmatian or Jock, Peg and Cesar from Lady and the Tramp.
In this film, New York City is magnified, with its manhole covers, bridges and even its billboards.

Bonus: Pip

A Spanish short film about Pip wanting to become a guide dog, despite his small size.

Good viewing !

Author: Corona

A danish deaf girl infused with tea the morning, Corona the evening (the beer not the virus!) and addicted to cookies all the time!

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